330 S. Reeves: Streamlined Comfort in Prime Beverly Hills

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Just east of the bustling shopping and dining enclave that is Beverly Boulevard sits this charming 2 bedroom/3 bathroom luxury condominium at 330 S. Reeves Drive. Situated in a 6-unit complex built in 1984, the spacious unit measures in at 1,902 ft. and is walking distance to the famous Rodeo Drive and just about all that Beverly Hills has to offer.

Like all LA origin stories, the story of Beverly Hills begins with water. The indigenous Tongva that inhabited the area we now know as Beverly Hills sustained life from the plentiful water and vegetation surrounding the canyons that formed streams near present day Beverly Drive and Sunset Boulevard (City of Beverly Hills). The area became known as El Rodeo de las Aguas, which roughly translates to “a surrounding of water” or a “gathering of water.”

1919 Map of Mexican Ranchos, Courtesy of USC Digital Library Collection, California Historical Society Collection

1919 Map of Mexican Ranchos, Courtesy of USC Digital Library Collection, California Historical Society Collection

Present-day Beverly Hills was on land that changed ownership a handful of times. For instance, in 1838, Rancho de las Aguas fell under the ownership of a feminist African American-Mexican woman named Dona Maria Rita Valdez. Valdez was the wife of a Spanish soldier Vicente Valdez. After a series of attempted takeovers by others, she eventually sold the land to Henry Hancock and Benjamin Wilson, but mysteriously the previously fertile land became drought-ridden after she ceded ownership.

The Manuel Valdez/Antonio Roches Adobe on the Rancho De Las Aguas Property (now present-day Robertson Blvd/3rd Street intersection), courtesy of USC Digital Library Collections, California Historical Society, 1920

The Manuel Valdez/Antonio Roches Adobe on the Rancho De Las Aguas Property (now present-day Robertson Blvd/3rd Street intersection), courtesy of USC Digital Library Collections, California Historical Society, 1920

330 S. Reeves Drive is about two miles away from the historic Los Angeles Country Club, which was formed by an association of volunteers wanting to help popularize the new, growing sport of golf. The original golf course and clubhouse went through several iterations and locations—it was first situated at the corner of Pico and Alvarado before moving to Hobart and 16th streets.

Exterior of Los Angeles Country Club, 1895, Photo courtesy of USC Digital Libraries Then, as the club grew, the association moved the location to Pico and Western, where it also laid out its first 18-hole golf course.

Exterior of Los Angeles Country Club, 1895, Photo courtesy of USC Digital Libraries

Then, as the club grew, the association moved the location to Pico and Western, where it also laid out its first 18-hole golf course.

Exterior of Los Angeles Country Club on Wilshire, 1914, courtesy of USC Digital Libraries

Exterior of Los Angeles Country Club on Wilshire, 1914, courtesy of USC Digital Libraries

In 1911, the club moved to its current and final resting place in Beverly Hills on Wilshire Boulevard. Boasting a gorgeous clubhouse, tennis courts, and 36 holes, the country club was recently renovated to resemble the design of George Thomas, Jr.’s design from 1921 (Wikipedia), and will be hosting the U.S. Open in 2023.

Even closer to the condo at 330 S. Reeves than the country club, right about where the Beverly Wilshire Hotel currently exists, there once existed—believe it or not—a racetrack.

Aerial View of Beverly Hills Racetrack, 1922

Aerial View of Beverly Hills Racetrack, 1922

The Beverly Hills Speedway was built in 1919 and, according to Wikipedia, was the first of its kind to incorporate banked turns. Cecil B. DeMille was an investor, and the track drew the likes of Hollywood’s A-listers like Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, and others. The speedway became so popular that real estate prices in the surrounding area began to soar, and eventually the racing association moved its operations to Culver City.

Los Angeles Times, April 20, 1913

Los Angeles Times, April 20, 1913

Another development in the early 1900s was the creation of the Rodeo Land and Water Company, owned by developer Burton E. Green and a few other investors. The company created the mixed-use area we now know as Rodeo Drive, and first marketed the area toward home-seekers and investors as “the beautiful home site between the city and sea.” It’s pretty hilarious now to think they had to actually convince people to live in what is now one of the most coveted parts of Los Angeles.

Los Angeles Times, September 20, 1911

Los Angeles Times, September 20, 1911

One of the first major developments initiated by the Rodeo Land and Water Company was the Beverly Hills Hotel, which was completed in 1912 and designed by architect Elmer Gray. The much-anticipated hotel touted as the “$300,000 hotel” was praised for its Spanish Mission architecture and considered one of the grandest hotels in the country. The famed shopping district came several decades later in the 1960s, with one of the first and most popular boutiques being Giorgio Armani.

Then, in 1961 a man named Fred Hayman, who has been hailed as “the godfather of Rodeo Drive,” purchased the Armani store and began building relationships with a number of European fashion brands.

Los Angeles Times, August 21, 1981

Los Angeles Times, August 21, 1981

The store became a bit of a tourist attraction and drew shoppers in to the district, According to his obit in the LA Times (he died in 2016), “Hayman pampered customers with a fully stocked bar, espresso machine, pool table and pub. He would have a vintage Rolls-Royce chauffeur clients to the store.” Pretty sweet idea to lure bored husbands in too, right?

The property at 330 S. Reeves Drive was built in 1984, right during the heyday of the Rodeo Drive shopping district.

Original ad for the current condos at 330 S. Reeves Drive, Los Angeles Times, October 27, 1984

Original ad for the current condos at 330 S. Reeves Drive, Los Angeles Times, October 27, 1984

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330 S. Reeves greets its visitors with a grand foyer—complete with cathedral ceilings, stunning hardwood floors throughout, and a breezy, spacious vibe that is both elegant and welcoming.

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The living areas boast tons of natural light, copious built-ins, and a fireplace.

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A wrap-around red brick entertainer’s patio is the perfect place for sunbathing, creating a tropical oasis, or for simply throwing fabulous parties.

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A breezy, open-air plan allows for tons of streaming natural light in the dining area adjacent to the wrap around patio.

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A white-tiled chef’s kitchen offers just about everything necessary for the perfect meal and is also patio-adjacent.

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Gorgeous hardwood floors continue on into the bedrooms, which also offer amenities like patio access, plentiful walk-in closets, and natural light.

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Other amenities include a washer/dryer area and a secured underground parking garage.

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The Jacuzzi tub and Jack and Jill vanity sinks in the bathroom are nothing to sneeze at, either. The condo provides streamlined, clean comfort in every detail.

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For those wanting to impress guests, the rooftop offers great panoramic views of the heart of Beverly Hills, where the condo is located.

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And impressed they will be—this gem is located in prime Beverly Hills. With a WalkScore of 90, tenants will have access to all the best of the city—including the shops on Beverly and Rodeo Drives, the Los Angeles Country Club, and the Grove.

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