146 S. Clark: Swanky Condo Living in Beverly Grove

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Much ado has been made about the name Beverly Grove as to whether it’s a suitable for the area that lies somewhere between The Beverly Center and The Grove. A quick scan of the LA Times mapping project’s comments for Beverly Grove confirms this with dozens of impassioned voices on all sides of the debate. Regardless, whether you call it Beverly Grove, the Miracle Mile, Beverly Heights, Beverly Melrose, South West Hollywood (SoWeHo), East Beverly Hills or Beverly Hills Adjacent, there’s no doubt that if you’re lucky enough to live in one of its amenity-filled residences like 146 S. Clark Drive, then you’ll just call it home. Read on to learn more about #302, for sale right now at $749,000

Built in 1992 by H & H Development, this four-story Mediterranean condo includes 8 spacious units, underground parking, and is located on a gorgeous, tree lined street blocks away from The Beverly Center, Largo, and all that Beverly Hills and West Hollywood has to offer.

Oakhurst Regency Condominiums

Oakhurst Regency Condominiums

H&H, a development company based in Beverly Hills, developed a variety of properties in the area, including the Oakhurst Regency condominiums at 458 N. Oakhurst Drive, Beverly Hills. Built in 1987 in the style of a French Chateau, it clearly echoes some of the same architectural features of 146 S. Clark Drive.

As of this writing, the west-facing unit #302 is currently for lease and offers 2 bedrooms/2 bathrooms and 1,326 square feet of living space. There are only two units on each floor, giving tenants a great deal of privacy.
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Wooden floors throughout accentuate the open, clean floor plan in the living room. French doors open onto a balcony for a clear view of this peaceful, verdant street.

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An intimate tile patio surrounded by foliage offers a perfect, private outdoor escape.

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An expansive dining area offers enough space for your favorite dinner party dining table.
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The master bedroom provides a roomy escape for relaxing at the end of the day. Modern furnishings keep the area streamlined, while hardwood floors add a touch of warmth to the design. Plantation shutters and recessed lighting allow just the right amount of light to stream through.
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Or…if you really want to get away from it all, how about a bathroom the size of a bedroom? We don’t know if it’s the double sink vanity or the marble finishes that make the bathroom a sublime experience. Oh wait…it’s the jacuzzi. Yeah, that’s it.
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A guest bathroom is equally as stunning with marble finishing throughout.
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A beautiful marble-topped dining table is the perfect furnishing for this lovely dining room.
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An equally stunning kitchen adjoins the dining room. Marble countertops, microwave, and large bay window are just a few of the details that make the kitchen a wonderful setting for gourmet cooking.
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Stacked washer and dryer in addition to ample storage and counter space make the home an ideal place for a family or anyone downsizing from a house.
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The second bedroom makes a perfect, serene nursery or work area.
8x10__IMG_4171_HDR Exit domestic bliss and you’ll find yourself close to some of the best that Los Angeles has to offer. 146 S. Clark’s prime location makes it ideal for shopping, dining, and basically any recreational activity your heart desires. And, if you’re ready to expand your family, you’re right next to Cedars-Sinai Hospital–birthplace to the stars.
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The area that we now call West Hollywood was once occupied by the Tongva people, who Spanish explorers referred to as Gabrielinos. Tiburcio Vasquez, a notorious bandit renown for his way with the ladies and his intelligence (he’s been referred to as a “Robin Hood”), resided in Rancho La Brea, now the Sunset Strip section in present-day West Hollywood.

Another prominent figure of the time laying the foundation for present-day WeHo is Moses Sherman, a land developer and founder of the Pacific Railway Company.

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Moses Sherman

He created a railway stop at the location of the Pacific and Pasadena electric railway lines that eventually became the town of Sherman. As Sherman grew and expanded into the nearby communities, the entire area became known as West Hollywood.

Streetcar boulevards near La Brea and San Vicente, 1936. Photo courtesy of USC Digital Libraries

Streetcar boulevards near La Brea and San Vicente, 1936. Photo courtesy of USC Digital Libraries

West Hollywood appealed to film stars because of its proximity to Hollywood, and in 1925, residents changed the name to West Hollywood. In 1927, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks opened a studio on Santa Monica Boulevard known as “The Lot.”

Aerial View of Pickford Fairbanks Studios, 1926

Aerial View of Pickford Fairbanks Studios, 1926

Throughout the years, The Lot went through a series of name changes that included the United Artists Studios and the Samuel Goldwyn Studios. In 2013, much to the dismay of West Hollywood residents and film buffs, a developer began demolishing buildings, revising their plan after much outcry. Today The Lot still remains and has recently been home to productions like True Blood, The Social Network, and The Bucket List.

The Pacific Electric’s “Balloon Route” trolley was probably the most popular of its day, and went through Sherman. It shuttled many a tourist from downtown Los Angeles through Hollywood, West LA, the beach resorts, and back to downtown.

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It’s likely that Burton Way, just south of 146 S. Clark, was a boulevard for the Pacific Electric streetcar due to its wide median. Also right near Burton Way, at 300 S. Doheny, is the Four Seasons Hotel. Constructed in 1987, it quickly became a West Hollywood institution, rivaling legendary hotels like the Beverly Wilshire and Beverly Hills Hotel in popularity. According to reviews on Yelp, the Four Seasons is a prime celebrity-spotting locale, with John Mayer, Yunjin Kim, and Jodie Foster listed as past sightings.

May 21, 1989 Santa Cruz Sentinel

May 21, 1989 Santa Cruz Sentinel

Burton Way is also home to Chris McMillan’s salon—he’s the man behind “The Rachel” and has been doing Jennifer Aniston’s hair for years.

"The Rachel" is Jennifer Aniston's signature haircut circa 1994 thanks to stylist Chris McMillan

“The Rachel” is Jennifer Aniston’s signature haircut circa 1994 thanks to stylist Chris McMillan

Ava Gardner and Mark Evans at Chasen's, photo courtesy of cruiselinehistory.com

Ava Gardner and Mark Evans at Chasen’s, photo courtesy of cruiselinehistory.com

Less than a 10-minute walk way from 146 S. Clark is the fabulous Bristol Farms grocery store. But what is more fabulous about the store is that it was once home to Chasen’s, a restaurant that catered to Old Hollywood’s biggest names. Humphrey Bogart, Cary Grant, Alfred Hitchcock, Marilyn Monroe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and many more dined here on the regular.

Famous for its chili, Chasen’s was a frequent location for the Academy Awards party. The owner, Dave Chasen, was a comedian who opened the restaurant in 1936 at the urging of his friend Frank Capra. Over the years, it developed quite a following, and has been referred to as the Spago of its time. Ronald Reagan proposed to Nancy Reagan in booth #9, and Jimmy Stewart held his bachelor party there. Bristol Farms managed to retain the original leather highbacked booths, and, thankfully, still serves Chasen’s delicious chili. And, according to an LA Times article, the ghosts of Chasen’s haven’t quite left: “Employees have reported hearing shopping carts going down the aisles when the store is closed, and grocery manager Pablo Solis says some of his night crew have been spooked. “Our former night maintenance man said a woman in white tapped him on the shoulder and said, ‘Excuse me. It’s dirty inside in the restaurant and the tables need to be cleaned.’ She just disappeared. He looked in and the tables hadn’t been cleared. He was really scared.” (Jarvis, Los Angeles Times, 2002)

A Chasen's menu from 1987, photo courtesy of Alan Light/Flickr

A Chasen’s menu from 1987, photo courtesy of Alan Light/Flickr

We’d be remiss if didn’t mention Robertson Boulevard. A quick stroll from 146 S. Clark will take you to the city’s best hub for celebrity-gawking, paparazzi, and boutique shopping. Robertson Boulevard was originally called Preuss Road, but was renamed in 1926 after developer George Robertson. Numerous swanky hotels, celebrity-rich restaurants like The Ivy, and boutique shops like Kitson, Tory Burch and dozens of others line this thoroughfare, as any well-heeled tourist or Angeleno will tell you. Living in Beverly Grove, shopping is practically an innate biological function, like eating and blinking. Melrose shops are also nearby, for all the Kardashian fans out there–there’s the popular DASH boutique right on the main drag in Melrose.

We could go on and on about the virtues of living in one of the most coveted areas of Los Angeles, but we think Lauren Rabaino, resident and commenter on the Beverly Grove section of the LA Times Mapping project says it best:

I have lived in the Beverly Grove community since December 2009. I love that it’s close (walking distance, even) to some of the best spots in West LA: The Grove, The Beverly Center, Wilshire Blvd, Beverly Connection, 3rd Street. It’s a 15 minute drive to Santa Monica and a 10 minute drive to the heart Hollywood and a 5 minute drive to Beverly Hills. The traffic is rarely unbearable, especially compared to other parts of LA. It’s a safe neighborhood, but a little expensive. The people here are young, creative, friendly. I love going for morning and afternoon jogs in the area just to see the sights and people watch. There’s no place I’d rather live.

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